Say NO to Fad diets

Introduction  

The world is in the grip of an obesity epidemic; additionally, a “fad diet” industry has arisen. Worldwide obesity has tripled since 1975. It is a chronic and multifactorial disease and one of the most important causes of morbidity and premature mortality worldwide. In my post, Is obesity a disease or risk factor for other conditions? I had discussed the magnitude of obesity and had also highlighted that today most of the major international and national health organisations, including the World Health Organization (WHO), World Obesity Federation, and American Medical Association recognise obesity as a disease. In my post, Childhood obesity: a serious public health challenge and Complications of obesity: the mother of all diseases, I had discussed the health implications of obesity.

The image depicts fronts covers of various diet books with a caption 'Say No to Fad Diets'.
Some popular fad diets.

In my post Diet Plan for Weight Loss – It is going to be a journey, I had discussed in detail, the dietary interventions for the management of obesity. However, in general, our beliefs about food are highly irrational and when we are struggling with weight, we want a magic pill, or in the least, a diet plan for weight loss that’s a functional equivalent of a pill. In my post Diet Plan for Weight Loss, referred to above, I had discussed the issue of weight loss and regain and had highlighted that due to the strong physiological tendency to regain weight, long-term weight loss maintenance remains the main challenge of obesity treatment. Another important aspect that I had discussed in this post was the dramatic disparity between the patient’s expectations from a weight loss regimen and the professional recommendations or reasonable weight loss that can be accomplished and maintained in most cases. The patient’s frustration and anxiety arising as a result of the gulf between the patient’s unrealistic expectations and professional recommendations have been exploited up to the hilt by the dieting industry.

Continue reading

Keto Diet – Debunking the Myth

Introduction

Obesity continues to be a major worldwide health problem, despite the efforts of the medical community. Intensive lifestyle interventions can achieve weight loss that is sustained over the long-term. Diet is an important component of any lifestyle intervention programme. The dietary plan that restricts energy and fat is the most common strategy and based on it, several other dietary strategies have been proposed. However, the very-low-carbohydrate, high-fat keto diet differs from these approaches. 

In my post Diet Plan for Weight Loss – It’s going to be a journey, I had described various options for the treatment of obesity. As highlighted there, the core principle of any obesity treatment is that it must shift the balance between energy intake and energy expenditure – treating obesity requires creating a state of negative energy balance, therefore a reduction in energy intake is the primary factor that needs to be addressed in a dietary intervention designed to promote weight loss. In the above post, under dietary interventions for the management of obesity, I had briefly discussed the various calorie reduction strategies including reduced-calorie diets, low-calorie diets (LCD), very-low-calorie diets (VLCD) and #keto diets. In the above referred to post, I had discussed reduced-calorie diets in details; in my post, Very-Low-Calorie Diet – All you Need to Know, I had discussed the LCDs and VLCDs. Here, in this post, I shall be discussing the keto diets.

Continue reading

Very Low Calorie Diet – All You Need to Know!

Introduction

In my post Diet Plan for Weight Loss – It’s going to be a journey, I had described various options for treatment of obesity. As highlighted there, the core principle of any obesity treatment is that it must shift the balance between energy intake and energy expenditure – treating obesity requires creating a state of negative energy balance, therefore a reduction in energy intake is the primary factor that needs to be addressed in a dietary intervention designed to promote weight loss. In the above post, under dietary interventions for the management of obesity, I had discussed various calorie reduction strategies including reduced-calorie diets, low-calorie diets (LCD) and very-low-calorie diets (VLCD). In the above referred to post, I had discussed reduced-calorie diets in details; here, in this post, I shall be discussing the other two diets plans viz. low-calorie diets and very-low-calorie diets. The use of very-low-calorie diets to induce rapid weight loss, in contrast to many other weight loss products in the market, is backed by decades of medical research, and very-low-calorie diets have been in clinical use for almost 40 years. 

A women shopping for vegetables in a food store. Consumption of fruits and vegetables are very useful in formulation of very low calorie diets.
Source: UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity
Continue reading

Diet Plan for Weight Loss – It’s going to be a journey.

Introduction

Before I discuss the diet plan for weight loss, the subject matter of this post, it would be worthwhile to discuss certain salient aspects of obesity. Obesity is a multifactorial disease and is the result of a complex interplay of genetic, environmental, metabolic, physiologic, behavioural and social factors; the underlying mechanism is a sustained positive energy imbalance (i.e. the energy intake is more than the expenditure). Therefore, irrespective of the cause(s) of obesity in an individual, the basic concept of weight loss for the management of obesity revolves around energy balance between the number of calories you consume and the number of calories your body uses. To lose weight, it is necessary to create a sustained negative energy imbalance, i.e. reduce energy intake below the energy expenditure and sustain it in the long-term. Though there are many strategies available, however in the present post, my focus will be primarily on formulating a diet plan for weight loss.

Diet plan for weight loss must include healthy foods such as fruits and vegetables.
Source: UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity
A woman shopping in the produce department of a grocery store.
Continue reading